Results tagged ‘ Reds ’

Fish Wrap – Marlins 10, Reds 2

GameFish is now a regular blogger for FishStripes. Read her game recaps and other thoughts on the 2010 Marlins there.

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The Marlins have definitely shown us their ability to battle* their way to wins so far this season, but in their series finale against the Reds Thursday, they finally took a break from the dramatics and made it look easy. (At least much easier than trying to identify players at the park, as everyone from Hanley to the ball boys donned number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day.)

It started with good pitching as fans saw glimpses of the Josh Johnson of old on the mound. JJ dominated Cincinnati through six innings, giving up only one run on five hits and striking out ten.

While Josh held the Reds to one run, the Marlins offense was on fire against Aaron Harang. They scattered four runs over the first four innings, and chased Harang from the game when they added another five runs in the fifth.

Cody Ross was 3-for-5 in the game with two doubles and three RBI. Cameron Maybin was 3-for-4, and hit his first home run of the season in the fourth inning. Dan Uggla and John Baker each had a pair of RBI, and Jorge drove in a run on a double in the fifth inning. With that hit, Cantu extended his record-breaking RBI streak to ten games to start the season, and 14 games dating back to the end of 2009.

Clay Hensley tossed two scoreless innings in relief of JJ, and Chris Leroux made his first appearance of the season for the Marlins in the ninth. He gave up triple to Gomes and allowed a run in his debut, but that was all for the Reds.

After dropping the first two games in miserable fashion, the Fish split the series, and are headed to Philly with a little win streak in the making.

* “battle” is a registered trademark of Marlins manager Fredi Gonzalez, and is used with permission.

You Can’t Spell Badenhop Without… SV?

GameFish is now a regular blogger for FishStripes. Read her game recaps and other thoughts on the 2010 Marlins there.

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After back-to-back extra-innings losses to the Reds, the Marlins and Homer Bailey and Cincinnati to try and right the ship.

And, well, consider the ship righted. At least for the day. Good pitching, good defense, record-breaking RBI, a near cycle, and the Hopper’s first career save were all it took to end the Marlins two-game losing streak. Too bad it wasn’t televised, and hardly anybody got to see it. But, you know, there was a very good poker game on FSFL, so…

The Fish didn’t have much trouble with Bailey. They got off to a quick start when Baker doubled to score Maybin and put the Marlins on the board in the first, and added another run in the second inning when Volstad helped out his own cause with a single that scored Gaby Sanchez from third.

Brett Carroll was activated from the DL Wednesday and made his season debut in left field. Cogz was banged up from his wild catch on Tuesday, and had the night off, and let’s just say Brett made up for lost time. After a double in his first at bat, he launched a solo home run in the fourth inning, and finished the night a triple short of the cycle. Welcome back, BC.

All eyes were on Jorge Cantu as he attempted to extend his RBI streak to nine games, and set a new Major League record. After he grounded into a double play and struck out in his first two at-bats, Jorge launched a ball to deep left for a home run in the bottom of the fifth. With that RBI, Jorge has now driven in a run in all nine games to start the season. He’s the first player to do so since the RBI became an official stat in 1920. (Hip Hip!…)

The Marlins added on in the sixth with another RBI from John Baker, and Homer Bailey’s night was done after giving up five runs on eight hits through 5 1/3 innings. 

Volstad went a little deeper into the game and had a 5-1 lead with two out in the seventh inning. Then, on his last pitch of the game, Vols served up a 2-run home run to Paul Janish to bring the Reds within two. Chris left the game after 6 2/3 innings, having allowed three runs on five hits, and 5 Ks. 

As a grande finale to a great game, it was Burke Badenhop who was called on to close. Hopper tossed two perfect innings, and struck out Laynce Nix looking to end the game for his first career save. 

Let’s have another one like that Thursday, shall we?

Fish Come From Behind, Drop It In Extras

GameFish is now a regular blogger for FishStripes. Read her game recaps and other thoughts on the 2010 Marlins there.

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Dear Florida Marlins,

If you are going to end up losing the game anyway, please stop forcing extra innings and getting our hopes up, only to dash them in the end. Thanks.

XOXO,

HLD&S

Game-tying home runs, web gems, and history-making hits weren’t enough to put the Fish in the win column. For the second night in a row, the Marlins were able to come back, only to end up losing in extra innings.

Nate Robertson made the start for Florida, and went just five innings, allowing six runs on five hits.

In the second inning Nate gave up a three-run homer to Johnny Gomes, and very nearly followed that up with another when Jay Bruce hit a long line drive to right that was originally ruled a home run. The call was overturned, but then with two out in the fourth, the long ball struck again. Nate gave up another three-run shot to Ryan Hanigan to put the Marlins in a 5-run hole. In all fairness to Robertson, those three runs were unearned, the result of Cantu’s misplay of a grounder for the Marlins 12th (and Major League-leading) error of the season.

The Marlins broke through against Bronson Arroyo in the fifth inning with RBI from Mike LambCameron MaybinHanley Ramirez and Jorge Cantu to bring the Fish within a run. With his RBI single, Jorge became just the second player in history, and first since 1921, to have at least one hit and one RBI in the first 8 games of the season.

The Reds scored another two runs in the top of the eighth off of Jose Veras, but in the bottom of the inning, the Marlins answered back against rookie reliever Logan OndrusekCody Ross walked up to bat to the usual chants of “Cody! Cody! Cody!” from the home crowd, and smashed a three-run home run to tie the game at 8.

Both bullpens held the score for two innings, but the Marlins luck ran out in the 11th. Dan Meyer gave up a single to Hanigan and walked Stubbs. Then with one out, Chris Coghlan further elevated the hopes of Fish fans when he showed off in left field, making a spectacular play and robbing Orlando Cabrera of a few RBI.

But it wasn’t enough to prevent the inevitable. After Coghlan’s web gem, Dan Meyer gave up the game-winning RBI single to Joey Votto. Francisco Cordero recorded another save, and the Fish dropped their second extra-inning affair in two days.

Sigh.

Fish Wrap – Marlins 5, Reds 6

GameFish is now a regular blogger for FishStripes. Read her game recaps and thoughts on the 2010 Marlins season there.

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It was the long ball and a dude named Scott Rolen that did the Marlins in.

The Fish opened a four-game set with the Reds at Sun Life Stadium Monday night, and continued their new trend of dropping the first game of every series. Ricky Nolasco was on the hill for Florida and Johnny Cueto made the start for Cincinnati.

The Reds grabbed a 2-run lead in the second when Scott Rolen hit his first home run of the game (it’s never a good sign when they have to be numbered), and Laynce Nix added an RBI single.

In the bottom of the inning, Cueto hit Dan Uggla and loaded the bases on singles to John Baker and Cody Ross. Gaby Sanchez grounded into a double play to score one run, but that’s all the Marlins could manage to extract from a bases loaded, no out situation.

Things went downhill a bit for Cueto in the bottom of the third. Maybin singled and Hanley walked before Jorge Cantu continued his campaign to have RBI in every game this season, and doubled to drive them both in. With Uggla at bat, Cueto balked to advance Jorge to third, and Uggs doubled to drive in the fourth run of the game.

Ricky must not have been feeling the whole prosperity thing the Fish had going for him, because the very next inning he gave up home run #2 to Scott Rolen. In the sixth, Ricky served up his third long ball of the game, a two-run shot to Orlando Cabrera to give the Reds a 5-4 lead.

Cueto was finished after five innings, which was good news for the Marlins, considering the Reds bullpen has stunk even worse than theirs so far this season. Unfortunately, they didn’t stink enough.

With two on in the seventh, Ronnie Paulino pinch hit for John Baker and hit an RBI single to tie the game.

After Ricky gave up five runs in six innings, the Marlins bullpen took over and managed to hold the score for three innings for the second game in a row. Tim Wood made three quick outs in the seventh, Clay Hensley pitched out of a jam in the eighth, and Leo Nunez worked a 1-2-3 ninth.

With one out in the bottom of the inning, the Fish had a good chance to walk off. They loaded the bases, but Paulino struck out and Cody grounded out to push the game into extras.

After proving to be the most valuable arm out of the ‘pen through the first week of the season, it was The Hopper who ended the bullpen’s scoreless inning streak. He issued his first walk of the season to Joey Votto and gave up his first run–an RBI single to none other than the pesky Scott Rolen to put the Reds in the back in the lead.

This time, they held on. The Fish went 1-2-3 in the bottom of the tenth, and dropped game one to the Reds.

Marlins make it two in a row in Cinci

If there was any lingering doubt as to whether the Marlins were really through with their losing ways in Cincinnati, they were laid to rest Saturday night when the Fish and the Reds faced off in game three of their series at the Great American Ball Park.

It was once again a good night for pitching. Ricky Nolasco put in a beautiful four hit, ten strikeout, seven inning performance, and Bronson Arroyo matched it with a nice night on the mound himself, allowing six hits to the Marlins through eight strong innings of work. 
The teams hit two home runs apiece to account for the only scoring in the game. 
The Reds took the lead in the first on a solo home run by Drew Stubbs, and maintained their lead until Jorge Cantu tied it up on a home run in the fifth. That was all the scoring the Fish could manage through the first seven innings of the game, so when Ricky gave up a solo home run to Ryan Hanigan in the seventh, he exited down 2-1, and in line for the loss. 
But after Ronny Paulino doubled in the eighth, Ross Gload pinch hit for Ricky and went deep to give the Marlins the lead, and a chance for Ricky to win the game.
Brian Sanches handled the eighth and one out of the ninth, and Dan Meyer got the second out of the ninth before Matt Lindstrom finished things off for his 15th save of the season. 
Thanks to Gload’s gritty pinch hit home run, Nolasco got the W, and the Marlins took their second game in a row at the Great American Ball Park.

Consider the Curse Reversed

Man_Jump_for_Joy.jpgAnother pitchers duel was in order for the Marlins and Reds as they faced off in game two of their series Friday night at the Great American Ball Park. 

Rick VandenHurk was on the Hill for the Marlins, and had a great night as he allowed just one run on four hits in six strong innings of work. It was too bad for Vandy that Homer Bailey went one better and tossed seven scoreless innings, and allowed just three hits to the Fish, taking away Hurk’s chance at the W. 

Sigh. 
One measly run was all the offense to speak of until the eighth inning, when the Reds scored an insurance run off of Brendan Donnelly. With closer Francisco Cordero coming in to pitch the ninth, it seemed that the Marlins would go quietly for their tenth loss in a row at the Great American Ball Park. 
Only they didn’t. 

The Fish rallied in the ninth. Coghlan led off the inning by reaching base on what was ruled an error, but was actually a base hit (we promise). Hanley Ramirez singled with one out, and Jorge Cantu drove in Coghlan to put the Fish on the board. Dan Uggla’s ground out scored Hanley, and Baker blooped a single into left to score Cantu and give the Fish the lead. After a single from Cody Ross, Jared Burton came out of the bullpen to replace Cordero.

Burton promptly gave up an RBI double to Brett Carroll, and the Marlins took a 4-2 lead. 

It was up to Leo Nunez (gulp) to shut down the Reds in the bottom half of the ninth, and given Leo’s affinity for the home run, and considering the tiny confines of the GABP, that was no small task. 
Naturally, Nunez gave up a long ball to pinch hitter Juan Francisco to lead off the bottom of the ninth and to put the Reds within a run. But that was all for the Reds, and Leo struck out two and closed it out for his 23rd save of the season. 
Brett Carroll’s RBI double ended up being the difference in the game, and for the first time since 2006, the Fish won a game in Cincinnati

Join us in a Victory dance, won’t you??!! 

The Curse of the GABP

GABP curse.jpgThe Marlins had lost eight games in a row at the Great American Ball Park going into a four-game series against the Reds in Cincinnati.

But all that was about to change. The curse was about to be broken, and the Marlins would prove once and for all that they are able to win games in the great state of Ohio.
Er, or that’s what we were hoping for as the series began Thursday night, but Anibal Sanchez was not in complete agreement with our personal hopes and dreams. At least not in the first inning.
Sanchez Struggled* in the first, leading off the game by giving up a home run to Darnell McDonald. Next, Anibal loaded up the bases, and Jay Bruce doubled to put the Reds up 3-0 over the Marlins.
After the first inning, Sanchez settled down and pitched four scoreless innings, but the damage, as they say, was already done. 
Against Matt Maloney, who was making a spot start for the Reds, the Fish only mustered two runs on seven hits. In the fifth inning, the Marlins scored twice when Hanley singled for his 100th RBI of the season, and Dan Uggla added an RBI double. Chris Coghlan also treated fans with a 4-for-4 performance in the game, but the Marlins couldn’t add on.
Both bullpens did a nice job in the remaining four innings of the game, and shut out their respective opponents. The Hopper tossed 1 2/3 innings, and Tim Wood finished things off for the Marlins. Unfortunately, three is greater than two no matter how you do the math, and so the Fish dropped their ninth straight game at the Great American Ball Park.
The curse apparently continues.
*Although we do understand how difficult it would be to write about Anibal without the inclusion of this phrase, Sanchez Struggled is a registered trademark of HLD&S, and is not to be used without the express written consent of this blog and its affiliates. 

Honeymoon: Over.

graham taylor.jpgRemember that super exciting 11-1 start the Marlins had? Yeah, me too. Since then, the Fish have won a total of four games. And lost 13. It’s not as though I expected the team to continue at that pace all season, but I also didn’t expect to be sitting just a game above .500 on the 8th of May.

After winning game one of their irritatingly short homestand, the Marlins dropped three in a row. A couple thoughts on that:

  • When one’s team scores six runs and one’s bullpen does not allow a run, one can usually expect at least a fair shot at winning a ballgame. That is, unless Graham Taylor happens to be starting for your team, in which case your chances of losing said ballgame are still sitting at around 89%.
  • In all fairness to Taylor, it’s not his fault the Marlins decided to start him before he’s ready. But maybe the next time he’s called up (hopefully not til 2012 or so), he could ask the organization to take a new headshot. When he has just given up eight runs in a little over two innings, this expression is the last thing I want to look at.
  • Marlins starters have now gone 20 straight games without a win, and there to rub it in our faces Wednesday was Derek Lowe. Our starters can’t even manage to squeeze a win out of a 3-hit shutout these days, and Lowe “earned” the W despite giving up six runs in his worst start of the year.
  • Not only did the Marlins lose the game Thursday, they also lost starter Anibal Sanchez to a shoulder injury. A rotation that is two-fifths Miller and Taylor is the stuff of nightmares. Let’s hope it just stays in my head and out of reality. (EDIT: Crisis averted. Juan Rodriguez reports Chris Coghlan will take Sanchy’s spot on the roster.)  
  • It’s great fun watching Hanley and Jorge attempt to singlehandedly win ballgames with their bats each night, but to quote Cantu, “it takes nine people to win a game.”
  • Dan Uggla: .190
  • Cameron Maybin: .202

Colorado, here we come.

Just Another Night at the Park

I should have known how the night would go when I took my seat and heard a voice behind me say, “Man, I miss the Bronx.”

No, scratch that. I should have known how the night would go upon seeing the name “Volquez” in the pitching matchup.

The Marlins managed just three hits off of Edinson Volquez last night in the second and final game of their series with the Reds. It was an offensive snoozefest, to say the least (well, unless you happened to be one of the lucky folks cheering for the team that employs Brandon Phillips). The night wasn’t a total bust for Fish fans, though, as the Marlins made up for their frigid bats with some real impressive defense and base running.

Despite the less-than-thrilling happenings on the field, my game experience was otherwise splendid. I can’t decide which part was my favorite– listening to the drunk Misser of the Bronx arguing with his “crazy, ungrateful” girlfriend on a cell phone all night, having the entire field of play blocked by The Family From Hell for a good 87% of the game, or being forced for five innings to play a card game with a kid I don’t even know because his parents wouldn’t tell him to leave me alone. It’s a toss-up, really.

7-0, Reds. The Marlins are now trailing the Phillies by half a game for first place in the NL East.

Oh, and by the way… Let Pete in.

You can’t spell Badenhop without N-A-P

power_nap_2.jpgA row of diehard Reds fans in the bullpen box abandoned their heckling and heartily rooted for the home team in the bottom of the 14th inning last night at Dolphin. Seems any sense of loyalty to Cincinnati dissipated around the same time their beer buzz wore off– five innings earlier, when a normal game is supposed to be over.

“Just score. Somebody. Anybody. Get us the **** out of here.” 
Not exactly as heartwarming a conversion to Fish fan-dom as Regis Philbin’s, but hey; we’ll take fans any way we can get them. (Last night we got them as a result of severe posterior distress via four-and-a-half hours in hard plastic orange seats.) 
My third Josh Johnson start at Dolphin went pretty much as expected, with JJ doing his level best to earn a W, and the offense doing its level best to extend the Marlins’ starters winless streak to 17 games. Hats off to the bullpen, which battled through seven innings to give the Marlins every chance to snap their three-game skid. In the end, all the heart and heroics of a lousy throw to first clinched the victory for the Fish, who won 3-2 on a walk-off error. 
Johnson cruised, Hanley crushed, and Cantu grounded into the game-winning double play (sort of). But in the end, after three scoreless innings in relief, it was Burke Badenhop who earned a write-in on my All-Star ballot, for making it totally worth it to head to work on three hours of sleep today.
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